Deterministic wallet - Bitcoin Wiki

Bitcoin Hierarchical Deterministic wallet in Python

Bitcoin Hierarchical Deterministic wallet in Python submitted by coincodecap to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

hierarchical deterministic wallets And CoinJoin (x-post from /r/Bitcoin)

submitted by ASICmachine to CryptoCurrencyClassic [link] [comments]

Is there a hierarchical deterministic way for wallet recovery in tezos wallets like for bitcoin?

Hi, when you have a bitcoin (or ETH) wallet and a private key for it, and when your specific wallet APP vanishes suddenly from the internet - you can easily take your private key (or your seedphrase), insert it in another available wallet APP , and continue to interact with your original bitcoin funds. u/CryptonomicTech,
To what degree do we have such a functionality within Tezos wallet systems?
Direct question: IF you have a tezbox wallet, can you take your tezbox seedphrase and enter it into Galleon and Galleon recognizes instantly your available XTZ funds?
If there is not any such feature currently within Tezos, Any experts here who find this useful as a proposal, for higher security and better fund recovery purposes?
Thanks
submitted by celentano1234 to tezos [link] [comments]

HD Wallets & Keychain Management for Users of BSV: FAIA Corp Head of Technology Brendan Lee explains what hierarchically deterministic key pairs would mean in the key chain management on Bitcoin SV blockchain

HD Wallets & Keychain Management for Users of BSV: FAIA Corp Head of Technology Brendan Lee explains what hierarchically deterministic key pairs would mean in the key chain management on Bitcoin SV blockchain submitted by zhell_ to bitcoincashSV [link] [comments]

New Flutter friendly Dart package for Bitcoin BIP32/Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets

submitted by mindshards to FlutterDev [link] [comments]

Hierarchical deterministic Bitcoin wallets that tolerate key leakage

Hierarchical deterministic Bitcoin wallets that tolerate key leakage submitted by ysangkok to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: New Flutter friendly Dart package for Bitcoin BIP32/Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets /r/FlutterDev

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: New Flutter friendly Dart package for Bitcoin BIP32/Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets /FlutterDev submitted by SimilarAdvantage to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Hierarchical deterministic Bitcoin wallets that tolerate key leakage (short paper)

submitted by drwasho to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hierarchical Deterministic Multisig - The Next Evolutionary Step for Bitcoin Wallets

Hierarchical Deterministic Multisig - The Next Evolutionary Step for Bitcoin Wallets submitted by kn0ckkn0ck1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Wallet32: A Hierarchical Deterministic Bitcoin Wallet for Android

Wallet32 is a BIP-0032 hierarchical deterministic bitcoin wallet for android. Features include:
The wallet is available in the Google play store at:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bonsai.wallet32
Source code available here:
https://github.com/ksedgwic/Wallet32
Please let me know what you think!
submitted by KenSedgwick to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Now that HD (hierarchically deterministic) wallets have been added to Bitcoin Core, is it now easier to create a cold storage wallet, sign offline transactions, and broadcast signed transactions using only Bitcoin Core?

If so, can you provide instructions on how to do this?
(It's a PITA to maintain a separate Armory on top of Bitcoin Core.)
submitted by btcfan8877lol to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Now that HD (hierarchically deterministic) wallets have been added to Bitcoin Core, is it now easier to create a cold storage wallet, sign offline transactions, and broadcast signed transactions using only Bitcoin Core? /r/Bitcoin

Now that HD (hierarchically deterministic) wallets have been added to Bitcoin Core, is it now easier to create a cold storage wallet, sign offline transactions, and broadcast signed transactions using only Bitcoin Core? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Hierarchical deterministic wallet - probability of address collision vulnerability slightly higher? /r/Bitcoin

Hierarchical deterministic wallet - probability of address collision vulnerability slightly higher? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Understanding Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets - Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Understanding Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets - Let's Talk Bitcoin! submitted by gamerandy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hierarchical Deterministic Multisig - The Next Evolutionary Step for Bitcoin Wallets

Hierarchical Deterministic Multisig - The Next Evolutionary Step for Bitcoin Wallets submitted by moon_drone to BetterBitcoin [link] [comments]

How much help can Hierarchical Deterministic trees of keys help with key management for non-expert users?

I've recently been made aware of BIP32, which was invented to make "Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets" (HD wallets) in BitCoin. I was wondering what uses this could have outside crypto currencies most notably for your "regular" cypherpunk using tools like GPG or Age to communicate with their web of trust.
A deterministic tree of key pairs basically works like this: you start with a root key pair, that must be generated once and never lost or compromised. Then you generate sub-keys by hashing that root key with an easily remembered index). If a sub-key is lost, it can be re-generated from the root key. Now, BIP32 has two ways of generating sub keys, each with their own tradeofs.
Note: I'll use the following names from now on:
G -- Generator of the group (public constant) a -- root private key A = a.G -- root public key b -- child private key B = b.G -- child public key. i -- public index (each child key has its own unique index) 
Hardened keys are generated from the private half of the root key (over-simplified for clarity):
b = KDF(a, i) B = b.G 
Key derivation can't be reversed, so if the child key b happens to be compromised, the root key a is still safe. The advantage of the deterministic generation is that if you lose the child key (you dumped your cell phone, your hard drive fried…) you can re-generate it from the root key, and pretend you never lost it.
Non-hardened keys are generated from the public half of the root key, such that even third parties can generate it:
z = KDF(A, i) Z = z.G b = a + z -- modulo group order B = A + Z B = a.G + z.G B = (a+z).G B = b.G 
Anyone can generate the public key, but generating the private key requires knowledge of the root private key. As far as I know, this is safe, because breaking this scheme would mean that we have solved the Discrete Logarithm Problem. However, if a non-hardened child key b is compromised, so is the root key. z is public (derived from the public root key), so knowing b easily reveals a:
b = a + z a = b - z 
Unless I'm missing something, this means we should not store non-hardened key pairs less securely than we store the root key itself.

Is there a compelling use case?

I was wondering how useful those could be, compared to a simple hierarchy of certified keys, where child keys are generated randomly, and simply signed by their parent key? With those simple hierarchies, you'd simply rotate keys from time to time, and other people would know to trust the new key based on certificate from the parent (or chain of ancestors). If you lose a key, you simply rotate (and sign) a new one.
One obvious advantage of deterministic hardened keys is that we can achieve continuity without relying on a certificate. We can afford to lose them even if we don't have an easy way to rotate them. But… aren't we supposed to rotate keys to begin with?
Then there are the deterministic non hardened keys. I'm not sure what they bring to the table exactly: with Bitcoin, they help you make wallets on the fly without giving your root key to the wallet factory. If I understand correctly, compromising the wallet factory may compromise your identity (we can link its generated keys with your own public key by knowing the indices), but it won't compromise your money (the private halves are still safe, so only you can transfer the coins away from those wallets).
Outside of crypto currencies however, I'm not sure: there's little point sending a message to a non-hardened child key instead of its parent key, since a compromise of the child key is just as bad as compromise of its aren't. One could still generate child keys without revealing the indices, but if you're anonymous, why not just generate a one-time key pair?
Simply put: What a reasonable key management for the paranoid private citizen should look like?
submitted by loup-vaillant to crypto [link] [comments]

BlockSettle Terminal - new light-weight bitcoin wallet with integrated trading model

The BlockSettle Terminal is an open-source desktop wallet that offers integrated non-custodial trading of bitcoin. The wallet is based on goatpig’s continued development of the Armory open-source stack.
Wallet features: • BIP 32 (Hierarchical Deterministic) wallet(s) • Native Segwit, Nested Segwit, Legacy address support • Watching-Only wallets • Offline/Remote signing • Hardware Wallet support (Trezor / Ledger) • Network connectivity through remote or local server • Coin control • RBF/CPFP • Fee control • BIP 39 and Armory seed imports • Built-in blockchain explorer • Armory interoperability
The trading model is a hybrid between centralized and decentralized platforms. In our model, the bitcoin leg is non-custodial (removing custody risk) while the fiat leg is centralized (in order to pool liquidity). Trading is currently limited to testnet while users get acquainted with the model.
Trading features: • Request-for-Quote matching • OTC off exchange reporting • Encrypted chat • Products o Bitcoin vs fiat o Bitcoin vs Coloured Coin (coinjoin trading) o Fiat vs fiat (FX)
Webpage: https://www.blocksettle.com/
Github: https://github.com/BlockSettle/terminal https://github.com/BlockSettle/BlockSettleDB
CTO: goatpig https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=7811
submitted by BlockSettle to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

BlockSettle Terminal - HW compatible light-weight wallet with integrated trading

The BlockSettle Terminal is an open-source desktop wallet that offers integrated non-custodial trading of bitcoin.
The wallet is based on goatpig’s continued development of the Armory open-source stack and is compatible with Ledger.
Wallet features: • BIP 32 (Hierarchical Deterministic) wallet(s) • Native Segwit, Nested Segwit, Legacy address support • Watching-Only wallets • Offline/Remote signing • Network connectivity through remote or local server • Coin control • RBF/CPFP • Fee control • BIP 39 and Armory seed imports • Built-in blockchain explorer • Armory interoperability
The trading model is a hybrid between centralized and decentralized platforms. In our model, the bitcoin leg is non-custodial (removing custody risk) while the fiat leg is centralized (in order to pool liquidity). Trading is currently limited to testnet while users get acquainted with the model.
Trading features: • Request-for-Quote matching • OTC off exchange reporting • Encrypted chat • Products o Bitcoin vs fiat o Bitcoin vs Coloured Coin (coinjoin trading) o Fiat vs fiat (FX)
Webpage: https://www.blocksettle.com/
Github: https://github.com/BlockSettle/terminal https://github.com/BlockSettle/BlockSettleDB
CTO: goatpig https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=7811
submitted by BlockSettle to ledger [link] [comments]

Fifty Years of Cypherpunk: History, Personalities, And Spread of its ideas

In this review, we tell how the ideas of cypherpunk were born, how they influenced cryptocurrencies, and modern technologies, who formed the basis and why its popularity these days has grown again.

From the early days to today: the chronology of key events of the cypherpunk

In the early 1970s, James Ellis of the UK Government Communications Center put forward the concept of public-key cryptography. In the early 1980s, small groups of hackers, mathematicians and cryptographers began working on the realization of this idea. One of them was an American cryptographer, Ph.D. David Chaum, who is sometimes called the godfather of cypherpunk. This new culture has proclaimed computer technology as a means of destroying state power and centralized management systems.Key figure among the cypherpunk of the 80s — Intel specialist Timothy C. May. His dream was to create a global system that allows anonymous exchange of information. He created the concept of the BlackNet system. In September 1988, May wrote The Crypto-Anarchist Manifesto: people themselves, without politicians, manage their lives, use cryptography, use digital currencies, and other decentralized tools.In 1989, David Chaum founded DigiCash an eCash digital money system with its CyberBucks and with the blind digital signature technology.Since 1992, Timothy May, John Gilmore (Electronic Frontier Foundation), and Eric Hughes (University of California) have begun holding secret meetings and regular PGP-encrypted mailing through anonymous remailer servers. And finally, in 1993 Eric Hughes published a fundamental document of the movement — А Cypherpunk's Manifesto. The importance of confidentiality, anonymous transactions, cryptographic protection — all these ideas were subsequently implemented in cryptocurrencies.The term "cypherpunk" was first used by hacker and programmer Jude Milhon to a group of crypto-anarchists.In 1995, Julian Assange, the creator of WikiLeaks, published his first post in cypherpunk mailing.In 1996, John Young and Deborah Natsios created the Cryptome, which published data related to security, privacy, freedom, cryptography. It is here that subsequently will be published data from the famous Edward Snowden.In 1997, cryptographer Dr. Adam Back (you know him as CEO of Blockstream) created Hashcash, a distributed anti-spam mechanism.In 1998, computer engineer Wei Dai published two concepts for creating a b-money digital payment system:
In April 2001, Bram Cohen developed the BitTorrent protocol and application.In 2002, Paul Syverson, Roger Dingledine and Nick Mathewson presented the alpha version of the anonymity network named TOR Project.In 2004, cypherpunk Hal Finney created the Reusable Proof of Work (RPoW) algorithm. It was based on Adam Back's Hashcash but its drawback was centralization.In 2005, cryptographer Nick Szabo, who developed the concept of smart contracts in the 1990s, announced the creation of Bit Gold — a digital collectible and investment item.In October 2008, legendary Satoshi Nakamoto created the manifesto “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System”, which refers to the works of the cypherpunk classics Adam Back and Wei Dai.In 2011, Ross William Ulbricht aka Dread Pirate Roberts created the Silk Road, the first major market for illegal goods and services on the darknet.In 2016, Julian Assange released the book "Cypherpunks: Freedom and the future of the Internet."At the beginning of 2018, Pavel Durov, the creator of Telegram, announced the launch of the TON multi-blockchain platform and mentioned his plans to launch TON ICO.In 2019, the Tor Project‌ introduced an open anti-censorship group.

Cypherpunk 2020

Plenty of services, products, and technologies were inspired by cypherpunk: Cryptocurrencies, HD (Hierarchical Deterministic) crypto wallets, Coin Mixers, ECDHM addresses, Privacy Coins. The ideas of distribution and anonymity were also implemented in the torrents and VPN. You can see the embodiment of cybersecurity ideas in the electronic signatures and protected messengers (Telegram, Signal, and many others).Why there were so many talks about cypherpunk this spring? In April 2020, Reddit users suggested that the letter from the famous cypherpunks mailing dated September 19, 1999, was written by Satoshi Nakamoto himself (or someone close to him). This letter is about the functioning of ecash. Anonymous (supposed Satoshi) talks about the "public double-spending database" and Wei Dai's b-money as a possible foundation for ecash.In addition, researchers of the mystery "Who is Satoshi Nakamoto?" periodically make some noise and discover the next "secret" about one or another legendary cypherpunks. So, in May 2020, Adam Back wrote in response to videos and new hype discussions that, despite some coincidences, he is not Satoshi.Other heroes of the scene are not idle too: in April 2020, David Chaum received $9.7 million during the presale of the confidential coin xx, created to encourage venture investors.

Conclusion

As you can see from the Satoshi Nakamoto's mentions and from the stories of DigiCash, Hashcash, RPoW, Bit Gold, the movement of cypherpunk influenced a lot the emergence of cryptocurrencies. As governments and corporations restrict freedom and interfere with confidentiality, cypherpunk ideas will periodically rise in popularity. And this confrontation will not end in the coming decades.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

[ELI5] Storing bitcoin securely.

Was gonna comment this, but thought it maybe deserved some more exposure for the newcomers:
Ownership Possession of bitcoin is basically defined by ownership possession/knowledge of private keys, since private keys are needed for signing transactions. If there's only one thing you are going to understand about bitcoin today, then understand that you need to keep your private keys FUCKING PRIVATE.
Having that said, private keys, in its most low level form are essentially just a string of 1's and 0's, in practice however we convert this binary format to more readable and fault tolerant formats like say "5Kb8kLf9zgWQnogidDA76MzPL6TsZZY36hWXMssSzNydYXYB9KF" (Do not use this! I've posted it here so clearly it's NOT FUCKING PRIVATE ANYMORE!
Good, now that you know that private keys are essentially just numbers. You need to know it's a pain in the ass to keep track of all the private keys you have. That's why some smart people devised Hierarchical deterministic wallets to generate a practically infinite amount of private keys from a single string of 24 (or sometimes 12) English words. These keys are generated in a deterministic way, meaning the same string of 24 words will always generate the same private keys. These wallets are known as HD-wallets. I hope it's clearly fucking obvious that you need to keep those 24 words FUCKING PRIVATE as well. It's called the Master Seed btw.
Now onto Hardware Wallets. Hardware wallets are simply devices that store your master seed and try to do absolute minimum of what is necessary to use bitcoin safely. Essentially they are devices to generate and store master seeds, generate private keys and sign transactions. Although, there is clearly some level of sophistication and complexity involved for such a device to even be able to perform these operations. Generally speaking, complexity is an enemy of security, so we want these devices to be as dumb as possible, the dumber the better.
When it comes to computer security, I would never trust a Windows box, ever. Linux is open source, which is a necessary but not sufficient condition for information security. Linux is awesome, but there are still plenty of attack vectors left for hackers to exploit on your linux box. You may want to play around with Electrum for small amounts first. Once you're comfortable with that, maybe try signing some transactions offline with an airgapped machine. If you're lazy, then just get a hardware wallet.
submitted by dont-listentome to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Megacoin MΣC 1.9.9.x - Release Notes - Short Overview

Megacoin MΣC 1.9.9.x - Release Notes - Short Overview

https://preview.redd.it/3ex64pfi6k251.jpg?width=1452&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c029b11966e1215b4bb95be70756923830c150a6

Masternodes
Megacoin MΣC 1.9.9.x brings along a masternode system for Bitcore. The collateral for one masternode is 4,200 MΣC . This allows up to 10,000 masternodes to support the network. The masternodes receive half of all generated bitcores. It is possible to setup a masternode with the minimum version 1.9.9.x or higher. A government system is included in the new core
Datacarriersize

https://preview.redd.it/jyf7ka176k251.jpg?width=1288&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=cd6f881532ffb0b26f02bc19ca73ecb52882748a
Megacoin MΣC 1.9.9.x increase the default datacarriersize up to 220 bytes. More infos con you find here | here no 2. | here no 3.
Command fork system
Different forks can be activated remotely in the future. This way we can ensure that all critical updates are only activated once all important network participants are ready.
Wallet changes
Megacoin MΣC 1.9.9.x introduces full support for segwit in the wallet and user interfaces. A new `-addresstype` argument has been added, which supports `legacy`, `p2sh-segwit` (default), and `bech32` addresses. It controls what kind of addresses are produced by `getnewaddress`, `getaccountaddress`, and `createmultisigaddress`. A `-changetype` argument has also been added, with the same options, and by default equal to `-addresstype`, to control which kind of change is used.
A new `address_type` parameter has been added to the `getnewaddress` and `addmultisigaddress` RPCs to specify which type of address to generate.
A `change_type` argument has been added to the `fundrawtransaction` RPC to override the `-changetype` argument for specific transactions.
All segwit addresses created through `getnewaddress` or `*multisig` RPCs explicitly get their redeemscripts added to the wallet file. This means that downgrading after creating a segwit address will work, as long as the wallet file is up to date.
All segwit keys in the wallet get an implicit redeemscript added, without it being written to the file. This means recovery of an old backup will work, as long as you use new software.
All keypool keys that are seen used in transactions explicitly get their redeemscripts added to the wallet files. This means that downgrading after recovering from a backup that includes a segwit address will work
Note that some RPCs do not yet support segwit addresses. Notably, `signmessage`/`verifymessage` doesn't support segwit addresses, nor does `importmulti` at this time. Support for segwit in those RPCs will continue to be added in future versions.
P2WPKH change outputs are now used by default if any destination in the transaction is a P2WPKH or P2WSH output. This is done to ensure the change output is as indistinguishable from the other outputs as possible in either case.
BIP173 (Bech32) Address support ("mec.." addresses)

https://preview.redd.it/kzg55cg36k251.jpg?width=1288&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=288ac36af63f4f5040ca2d20c9d8f07b78d99a5a

Full support for native segwit addresses (BIP173 / Bech32) has now been added.
This includes the ability to send to BIP173 addresses (including non-v0 ones), and generating these addresses (including as default new addresses, see above).
A checkbox has been added to the GUI to select whether a Bech32 address or P2SH-wrapped address should be generated when using segwit addresses. When launched with `-addresstype=bech32` it is checked by default. When launched with `-addresstype=legacy` it is unchecked and disabled.
HD-wallets by default
Due to a backward-incompatible change in the wallet database, wallets created with version 0.15.2 will be rejected by previous versions. Also, version 0.15.2 will only create hierarchical deterministic (HD) wallets. Note that this only applies to new wallets; wallets made with previous versions will not be upgraded to be HD.
Replace-By-Fee by default in GUI
The send screen now uses BIP125 RBF by default, regardless of `-walletrbf`.There is a checkbox to mark the transaction as final.
The RPC default remains unchanged: to use RBF, launch with `-walletrbf=1` oruse the `replaceable` argument for individual transactions.
Wallets directory configuration (`-walletdir`)
Megacoin MΣC 1.9.9.x now has more flexibility in where the wallets directory can belocated. Previously wallet database files were stored at the top level of thebitcoin data directory. The behavior is now:
For new installations (where the data directory doesn't already exist), wallets will now be stored in a new `wallets/` subdirectory inside the data directory by default.
For existing nodes (where the data directory already exists), wallets will be stored in the data directory root by default. If a `wallets/` subdirectory already exists in the data directory root, then wallets will be stored in the `wallets/` subdirectory by default.- The location of the wallets directory can be overridden by specifying a
`-walletdir=` option where `` can be an absolute path to a directory or directory symlink.
Care should be taken when choosing the wallets directory location, as if itbecomes unavailable during operation, funds may be lost.
Support for signalling pruned nodes (BIP159)


Pruned nodes can now signal BIP159's NODE_NETWORK_LIMITED using service bits, in preparation forfull BIP159 support in later versions. This would allow pruned nodes to serve the most recent blocks. However, the current change does not yet include support for connecting to these pruned peers.
GUI changes
We have added a new Walletdesign. The option to reuse a previous address has now been removed. This was justified by the need to "resend" an invoice, but now that we have the request history, that need should be gone.- Support for searching by TXID has been added, rather than just address and label.- A "Use available balance" option has been added to the send coins dialog, to add the remaining available wallet balance to a transaction output.- A toggle for unblinding the password fields on the password dialog has been added
Security
We change the coinbase maturity via command fork from 100 to 576 blocks. Also we have pumb the default the protoversion to 70006. It is possible later to disconnect the old version via command fork.
Hashalgorythm
Megacoin MΣC 1.9.9.x supports a completely new hashalgo "Mega_MEC".
Sources
Bitcoin Core, Dash Core, FXTC Core, LTC Core, PIVX Core, Bitcoin Cash Core, Bitcore BTX Odarhom
submitted by limxdev to megacoinmec [link] [comments]

BlockSettle Terminal - HW compatible light-weight wallet with integrated trading

The BlockSettle Terminal is an open-source desktop wallet that offers integrated non-custodial trading of bitcoin.
The wallet is based on goatpig’s continued development of the Armory open-source stack and is compatible with Ledger.
Wallet features: • BIP 32 (Hierarchical Deterministic) wallet(s) • Native Segwit, Nested Segwit, Legacy address support • Watching-Only wallets • Offline/Remote signing • Network connectivity through remote or local server • Coin control • RBF/CPFP • Fee control • BIP 39 and Armory seed imports • Built-in blockchain explorer • Armory interoperability
The trading model is a hybrid between centralized and decentralized platforms. In our model, the bitcoin leg is non-custodial (removing custody risk) while the fiat leg is centralized (in order to pool liquidity). Trading is currently limited to testnet while users get acquainted with the model.
Trading features: • Request-for-Quote matching • OTC off exchange reporting • Encrypted chat • Products o Bitcoin vs fiat o Bitcoin vs Coloured Coin (coinjoin trading) o Fiat vs fiat (FX)
Webpage: https://www.blocksettle.com/
Github: https://github.com/BlockSettle/terminal https://github.com/BlockSettle/BlockSettleDB
CTO: goatpig https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=7811
submitted by BlockSettle to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

Wie funktionieren Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets?  Teil 13 Kryptographie Crashkurs HOW HIERARCHICAL DETERMINISTIC WALLETS ELIMINATE THE MIDDLE MAN FOR MERCHANTS How do Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets work?  Part 13 Cryptography Crashcourse Wallets: From A to Hierarchically Deterministic – Dimitry “Rassah” Murashchik Bitcoin Tutorial #17 - Deterministic oder Seeded Wallets

Type 1: Single Chain Wallets¶ Type 1 deterministic wallets are the simpler of the two, which can create a single series of keys from a single seed. A primary weakness is that if the seed is leaked, all funds are compromised, and wallet sharing is extremely limited. However, deterministic wallets in Bitcoin do not stop there. In fact, the latest deterministic wallets go beyond the simple design described above and have two key properties that are heavily advertised by their developers. The first of these properties is the concept of a “ master public key“. A master public key is a key that can be generated from the wallet’s master private key ... Indeed, Bitcoin and derivatives of Bitcoin (examples: Litecoin, Bitcoin Cash) use changing addresses. This is due to them using an advanced feature known as Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets (HD). Once you’ve used a Bitcoin address to receive funds, a new one would be generated for you to use. Deterministic wallets can generate an unlimited number of addresses on the fly and as such don't suffer from this issue. As the addresses are generated in a known fashion rather than randomly some clients can be used on multiple devices without the risk of losing funds. Users can conveniently create a single backup of the seed in a human readable format that will last the life of the wallet ... This document describes hierarchical deterministic wallets (or "HD Wallets"): wallets which can be shared partially or entirely with different systems, each with or without the ability to spend coins. The specification is intended to set a standard for deterministic wallets that can be interchanged between different clients. Although the ...

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Wie funktionieren Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets? Teil 13 Kryptographie Crashkurs

How do Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets work? Part 13 Cryptography Crashcourse - Duration: 9:17. Dr. Julian Hosp - Blockchain, Krypto, Bitcoin ... HOW HIERARCHICAL DETERMINISTIC WALLETS ELIMINATE THE MIDDLE MAN FOR MERCHANTS - Duration: 14 ... How to make a Bitcoin Paper Wallet - Duration: 9:25. BTC Sessions 209,245 views. 9:25 ... hierarchical deterministic - how do hierarchical deterministic wallets work? Newly created wallets will use hierarchical deterministic key generation accordi... Blockchain tutorial 29: Hierarchical Deterministic wallet - BIP32 and BIP44 - Duration: 25:55. ... What Is A Bitcoin Wallet? - The Best Explanation EVER - Duration: 4:06. The Cryptoverse ... In diesem Tutorial geht's um Seeded Wallets aka Deterministic Wallets. Früherer Zugang zu Tutorials, Abstimmungen, Live-Events und Downloads http...

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